So, it wasn't as bad as I thought it were. I used to think that as disappointed as I was with Philippine cinema I could always look at Bollywood movies. I considered any movie that had people breaking into song too bakya. My Asian Cinema class proves me wrong. Their movies are cultural fairy tales that maintain an air of dignity and sophistication without compromise.
Thefirst film, Lagaan, I thought reeked of those Indian films I skip on cable television. The 4-hour duration also left me very pessimistic but by the end of thefirst half, I didn't need the intermission. It could've been any sports flick glorifying the underdog theory but with that Indian twist, it comes up more fun and amazing. The movie seems to have the tried and tested formulas of love triangles in an epic and panoramic landscape. A nice touch again would be the historical depiction of taxation without representation. The last scenes of the climactic cricket game are exhilarating. I find any movie good if I can't help but squeal with excitement. Monsoon Wedding would then have the Father and the Bride rip-off but still comes together with its ensemble cast. Tying the traditions to the modern-days reverberate and each character with his/her own story is not one strand out of place.
I love these two movies. I want to have Bollywood-themed parties. I want to make a Bollywood film. Myfirst taste of such a film was the westernized The Guru. But watching these authentic films gave me a huge rush. I cannot stand the feeling that there are much more films I need to watch. It is an amazing act that this industry can churn out more movies than Hollywood. I want to have an Indian Boyfriend with a British accent. I will watch him play cricket and we will sip tea in the afternoon. I want my children to have their eyes and noses. I am gushing like a fan girl but with a filmmaker perspective, I want to make quality Filipino films. These films are treme