In the Arden's performance of Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, the production is able to surprise the audience with a brilliant display of theatricality.Tom Stoppard has even said he enjoys the theater because it incorporates many different characteristics, which help to create surprise and suspense, so that no one play, even if performed by the same cast, will ever be the same (Farnsworth).On Friday, October 31, 2003, with surprise actions and unexpected props, the Arden Theater put on a dazzling presentation of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.The director uses inconceivable tricks to keep the audience on their feet.The actors commit to the role as only professionals can and add their own spice to zest up each individual role.The stage itself is made to deceive the spectators by creating false appearances on the set.With all these aspects working together, Stoppard is correct to say that theater utilizes theatricality which, in turn, creates drama and suspense for the viewers.
The actors have a huge burden on their shoulders at the beginning of the play: to try to keep the audience interested and never make the show predictable.In the Arden's performance of this play, the actors do more than just keep the spectators interested; they keep everyone on the edge of their seats and their jaws dropped after every scene.They are able to do this with theatrical devices such as blocking, body/facial expressions, and the tone in their voices.The best character by far was Rosencrantz, who was played by Ian Peakes.A simple twitch of his brow, and the audience would laugh.Like an unknown Jim Carrey, he could have the whole room focused on him, even if he was not the character speaking.He was very well complimented by costar Scott Greer, who took on the role of Guildenstern.The two worked hand in hand, as if they knew what the other was thinking.Their use of blocking would g…