Several works by contemporary writers (Kissling, 1999; Lafky; 1999; Owen, 1999; Wayne; 2000) contrast the reading by Mellencamp (1986). Although written with almost two decades of intellectual development in feminist writings, there are parallels between the writings demonstrating that some things have not changed with time and development in feminist thinking. Whilst Mellencamp reviewed productions from the 1950's Owen and Lafky look into contemporary programs, in particular Buffy the Vampire slayer and Twin Peaks. Their discourses focus in different directions however the comparisons are amongst all writings are interesting not only in terms of observing the state of television programs which reflect different social tendencies, trends and desires for normative behaviour, it is also interesting comparison because of the development in the feminist debates surrounding those critiques. Mellencamp views the emergence of situational comedies in the 1950s US society as a secretive push by sections of women society in the US at the time to escape and subvert the male patriarchal dominance of the time with television narrative of humour.She presents it as a resistance, as the personalities of Lucy and Gracie where images of a suppressed ideal for many women who were drowned by the tide of society's push for an ideal woman being the quite housewife in the working father in the nuclear family model. It was a quite subversion as humour was acceptable to men and women equally and did not offend sensitivities of a dominant class. Not enough was made of this point, which it perhaps should have been.
Television programs produced decades later did not attempt to show a facade of unreal idealism, but rather has focused on a narrative where women, in particular young women, have independence of mind and power of self will (Owen, 1999; 25; Lafky, 1999; 7). The popular dramatic teen series such as Dawson’s Creek, Felicity, and Party of F…