A “fatal flaw,” is a trait of a character that is a weakness and leads the character to his downfall.The play Julius Caesar, written by William Shakespeare, shows this concept of a “fatal flaw.”This play speaks about a militant general who gained power after winning many wars, and believed he could become emperor of the Roman republic. Roman Generals feared Caesar was becoming too popular among the Romans and Rome was bound to be his. They decided to take matters into their own hands, even if it meant the death of a great hero.
Julius Caesar, a powerful and brilliant general, was under the influence of ignoring numerous warnings from friends and relatives who knew what was best.One example of this was when Caesar receives a warning from a soothsayer to beware of the Ides of March. Caesar feared the soothsayer's message, but he showed himself to the public as if he wasn't afraid of anything. Another example was when Caesar's wife had nightmares of people on fire and beasts roaming the streets. This meant that Caesar was going to be murdered and shouldn't go to the senate house. Caesar decides to go to the senate house; He believed that the senate was going to make him king that day. Caesar received various omens to take precautions before stepping outside, but he didn't listen.Fate caused Caesar to be stubborn, and once he let his guard down he was assassinated.
Marcus Brutus, an important judge of Rome is portrayed as a character that is easily influenced by another man's word.One example of this is when Cassius flatters Brutus and sends him letters pleading that Brutus should strike Caesar down. These actions manipulate Brutus to believe Caesar must be murdered, or else Rome will crumble under his kingship. Brutus was gullible and fell into Cassius's trap by taking part in the conspiracy.A second example of this is at the funeral of Caesar. Brutus is thefirst to give his speech on b…