Fauvism is the short-lived (really short, only lasted from 1989 to 1908, all but ten years) Wild Beast of the expressionists, the one with the widest range of un-natural colors and the luminosity of a million suns. It is the kind of style where the color rules supreme, and serves as the primary conveyor of its user, presenting the meaning and serves as the emotion force of the piece.
The creator of this style of art was Matisse, and he was heavily influenced by
The Neoimpressionists; probably because of the fact, that he was a student of Gustave Moreau. Yet, it is clearly seen in Matisse's Woman with the Hat, that the contrasting, vibrant and unnatural colors he used was the main theme in Fauvism. The colors were so pure to their own, that it got a hold of the viewer's attention, and received stronger reactions from its audience it as well as lit up the picture with the unique luminosity only those purest of colors combined as one can give. It is a magnificent style of its time.
There were others who followed this short-lived style which included; Marquet, Rouault, Camoir, Puy, Manguin, Derain, Vlaminck, Havre, Friesz, Dufy, Braque, and Dongen. More noticeably from the group was Derain with his landscape with pure color, applied with short and powerful strokes. The period of Fauvism was a brief period where the arts were liberated from its original limitations of color, and brought strong influences to the later twentieth-century styles; especially to the Germen Impressionist Kandinsky.