Film goes as far back as the late 1800's, back to Thomas Edison.Although he had no intention on creating'moving pictures' at the time, fate still had a shift of events that changed history.Then in 1891 Edison created the Kinetoscope which became quite popular throughout America when parlors featuring the Kinetoscope were opened in 1984.He eventually dismissed the potential of the Kinetoscope believing it to be just another fad and would at some point die out.Little did he know how his discovery would not only be popular in America, but soon become a sensation throughout world.
A little over a year later in Paris, France cinematographers Louis and August Lumiere created a way to combine Edisons Kinetoscope with the magic lantern which led them to their next invention (handcranked cameras) that enabled them to shoot, print, and project moving pictures.Although they were limited to film only 15-20 seconds of film at a time, these Frenchmen travelled the world to create shorts films of people, places, and events.Soon after when they had theirfirst film strips available and ready they gave theirfirst viewing audience access at the Grand Café in Paris on December 28, 1895.
Between 1896 and 1906 a French illusionist, George Melies, was a true artist when it came to putting stories and fantasies onto film and was also known by many as the "father of narrative film."His most famous film A Trip to the Moon inspired and influenced upcoming filmmakers to step out of the box of imagination and that not all you see in film has to be real, but fictional entertainment.
However, not even Melies could predict what was in store for future audiences when it came to film evolution.Especially in 1903 when Edwin S. Porter created a popular and intense Western called The Great Train Robbery.This film established the basic principles of continuity editing and expanded the vocabulary of the alrea…