The use of either physical (such as the aggressiveness shown by the Cheka, the Russian secret police) or political force (such as War Communism) was prevalent in both the French (Between May 1789 – 1795) and Russian (Between February 1917 – 1924) revolutions. To protect and reinforce the revolutions (which were violent overthrows of the government) leaders of the time believed that force (which is defined as the use of power) was the an option available to secure the revolution. The force used came in different forms such as the Reign of Terror in France, to the Red Terror experienced in the Russian Civil War. Force was seen in many eyes to be the solution to securing the revolution and preventing any counter-revolutions, however it was not the only factor that secured the consolidation of the revolutions. Factors such as the N.E.P (New Economic Policy) implemented by Lenin, contributed to the stability of the revolution, as it was a reform that needed to implemented for the revolution to be a success.
During the course of the French and Russian Revolutions the threat of counter-revolutions always loomed. One of the threats of counter-revolutions came from the previous leaders (King Louis XVI and Tsar Nicholas II) creating an uprising to topple the revolution. King Louis XVI attempted to do this in the famous Flight To Varennes, which took place in June 1791; where Louis XVI and his Austrian wife Marie Antoinette attempted to flee France, in order to rebuild their counter-revolutionary forces. However their effort was halted and both were brought back to Paris, and taken prisoner. This showed that the old imperial leader could not be trusted, which eventually led to the death of King Louis XVI, and a major hope of any counter-revolution. It is obvious to see that force, by the death of the past leaders was necessary in order to make sure that they never regained power again, to counter the revolution.
After 1792, the …