Religion over the ages has served the purpose of trying to explain creation and life to the people who follow it. Religion, particularly that of ancient peoples, has used Gods to explain life, creation, and morals among other things it followers. Religion also sought to explain the unexplainable. Because Religions tend to serve the same purpose despite different followers, they often end up being similar to one another. Comparisons of different religions and myths become relatively easy due to their similarities. Norse Mythology can easily compared to Greek Mythology.
Norse Mythology was mainly a religion of the Northern People during the early Middle Ages. It's followers hailed from lands such as Scandinavia, Sweden and Denmark. The Greeks on the other hand had a religion that reached its highest point hundreds of years before the Common Era. The Greeks had a slightly different view on religion partially because they lived in a friendlier climate. Norse people spent their harsh winters with no light and their summers with no darkness. They had extremes in weather at all times of the year, and their seas were dangerous with the strong winds and stronger storms. The Greeks on the other hand had a more moderate climate. Their winters were cold but not terrible and their summers were warm and pleasant. While the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas were not the safest or most pleasant routes of travel they were heaven in comparison to the North Sea of the Norse People. These differences in climate caused differences in lifestyle and overall differences in beliefs. However, despite this the Norse and the Greeks still managed to have very similar beliefs and myths.
Gods are perhaps the most obviously similar aspects between the Norse and the Greeks. Thor was the son of Odin and a member of the Aesir, the name for a group Norse gods. He was the god of thunder and the main enemy of the giants. Thor's main weapon was his mighty axe…