In Agricola, Tacitus recounts the contrast between barbarian peoples living in such backward area such as Britain and the civilized Romans in the heart of the empire through the life of Agricola.Agricola is depicted with all the standard attributes of the prudent and successful general.Tacitus reveals that "in spite of all, Agricola decided to go and meet peril" (Tacitus 69).Thus this depicts Agricola as warrior-like as well as a successful general.Also, the Roman noble was born to a tradition of service to the state as seen through Agricola.Moreover, Tacitus idealizes Agricola's most prominent characteristic of moderation, which is, self-effacing behavior in order not to provoke the displeasure and jealously of the people around him.For instance, Tacitus points out, Agricola "understood the feeling…resolved to root out the causes of rebellion…Beginning with himself and his staff, he enforced discipline in his own establishmentfirst" (Tacitus 70). Moreover, Agricola would instill education among the "barbaric" people of Britain as Agricola "educated the sons of the chiefs in the liberal arts…speak Latin language effectively…and spoke of'civilization'" (Tacitus 73).Thus Agricola is shown as a sensible man with much achievements in Britain.As a result, Agricola is a man whose achievements far excel those of other men who pursue courses of willful independence and die ostentatious death.Charlemagne was considered great because he was a strong ruler who brought about numerous changes in Europe.Like Agricola, Charlemagne was depicted as being successful in wars, as "Charlemagne pressed on energetically…refusing to withdraw from a campaign already started…brought to complete fruition what he was striving to achieve" (Charlemagne 59).Furthermore, Charlemagne was determined to make his kingdom as strong as possible.Thus Charlemagne would