There have been many documentaries and dramatic productions focusing on the Holocaust. The film, Schindler's List is one of the most serious, accurate, and compelling nondocumentary accounts so far. With the vision of unforgettable images, this movie shows the anguish and endless struggle the massacred Jews suffered. This film explores the many sides of humanity during one of the most terrifying times in recent history. Some people, however, may respond negatively to the fact that there may be some historical inaccuracies, or maybe a lack of focus on the real issues, but no film can ever capture the full torment, or the whole sequence of a six-year war. I feel this movie gives an efficient description of what the Holocaust was merely all about. It frankly describes the senseless murder of innocence Jews.
Schindler's List clarifies and depicts three major stories. One is the true tale of the Holocaust, displaying new representations of bad memories. These images of the Jewish ghettos presented may or may not be accurate, but they certainly looked creditable. Everything from the people, the streets, and the clothing they wore all gave me an overall impression of gloom and despair, an exact detail of what was taken place at the time of the Holocaust. The second story given was that of Oskar Schindler himself. At the start of the film Schindler is no more than a self-centered capitalist who sees the advantage of employing Jews because they work for lower wages. Later, we get some impression that his perspective changes, and he risks losing everything to save as many lives as he can. The third story lies on the Nazi commander of Krakow, Amon Goeth, a man who is on the full brink of madness. As written in many documentaries, Goeth could easily have become an immoral monster, but in this movie he shows unexpected intensity and confusion in his character. Particularly, in the tense scene with