The Great Gatsby and Things Fall Apart
In this world there are heroes and villains. Neither Gatsby nor Okonkwo are good or bad. Okonkwo seems bad early on, when he beats his wives; he does however show compassion when he goes after Ezinma. Gatsby does something illegal, but everything he does is for Daisy. Their fatal flaws blind both Gatsby and Okonkwo. Okonkwo's hubris is that he believes in the Umuofian dream of a perfect society, while Gatsby believes that he is able to erase the past. Their fates are worse than they deserved, Okonkwo is banished from Umuofia after accidentally killing someone and Gatsby does not have the love of Daisy, as he believes. Both Okonkwo from Things Fall Apart and Gatsby from The Great Gatsby are tragic heroes.
In Things Fall Apart it seems as if Okonkwo is bad, as he beats his wives and children, he does however show compassion. One night Chielo comes and takes Ezinma to her cave. Okonkwo stays when Ekwefi, against what everyone else says, goes. "When he thought he had waited long enough he again returned to the shrine. But the Hills and the Caves were as silent as death. It was only on his fourth trip that he had found Ekwefi, and by then he had become gravely worried." (Achebe, 1959, 112) Okonkwo must be a man without fear, and he pretends not to have any feelings, but he shows love when he goes after his daughter. Gatsby has a lot of money, and he achieved it through illegal means.
"'I found out what your "drug-stores" were.' He turned to us and spoke rapidly.'He and this Wolfsheim bought up a lot of side-street drug-stores here and in Chicago and sold grain alcohol over the counter. That's one of his little stunts. I picked him for a bootlegger thefirst time I saw him, and I wasn't far wrong'"(Fitzgerald, 1925, 85)
Even though his entire fortune is made of il