Proletarians-the working class intended to "haunt" Europe and seize control of it. For these people as well as all the other European socialist and communist parties in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, The Communist Manifesto written by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, eventually became one of the principal programmatic statements. The book was preaching for the fall of the ruling classes and the emergence of the workers. This being the main topic of the "Manifesto" inspired people to believe that the bourgeois exploited them as well as everything else only to benefit themselves. In four chapters and an introduction, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, develop the fall of bourgeoisie, the idea of communism and most importantly the rise of proletariat.
The "Manifesto" opens with a phrase: "A spectre is haunting Europe-the spectre of communism." The intention of it is the same as of the entire chapter, the acknowledgement of the spread of communism and its strength ("Communist Manifesto"). The role of the "Manifesto" is shown as promoting the communist beliefs. In the very next chapter "Bourgeoisie and Proletarians" some of these most radical beliefs are expressed.
According to Marx and Engels, the struggle of classes is inevitable. Yet, by the working class taking over, there would be no more classes and humans would be equal. The main reason behind the bourgeois being the antagonist is that they are oppressors, the inheritors of the feudal system where they exploit their surrounding. Marx and Engels condemn free trade as a mean of exploitation, which demands the poorer people and nations to depend on the richer ones. "Universal interdependence of nations" is not seen as a beneficial factor, but just another symbol of the rich, taking all the wealth from the p