Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" was written in 1776 in order to persuade the colonists to gain independence from Great Britain. His impassioned pamphlet sold over 100,000 copies throughout all of the colonies. The colonists at that time were split in opinion of whether to separate completely with Britain, or to gain reconciliation with Britain. Throughout his essay he provides evidence to give him reason to give up hope on reconciliation with Britain. He also writes this pamphlet in a certain form in order to persuade the reader's opinion.
Thomas Paine presents evidence that gives him a basis for losing hope of gaining reconciliation with Great Britain. First of all, Paine tells his readers that he used to want to be peaceful with England, but that after the Battles of Lexington and Concord he realized that the relationship and present circumstances between America and Great Britain had depreciated too much for reconciliation. He also said that Britain would always keep on imposing oppressive laws and taxes, by proving that England has done it to them before and they will not stop. Paine means that if they make peace now, there will be more trouble later.
This pamphlet was one of the most important pieces of literature in early America because it was extremely influential to many people throughout all of the American colonies. In "Common Sense", Paine convinces his audience that it is common sense for the colonists to break completely with Great Britain. Hefirst uses the Bible to convince people, considering basically all of the colonists were Christians. He argues that a monarchy is terrible, and to have a king is not only an unsuccessful way to rule a nation, but it is also a sin. He says that the God did not want a king for the people and that God is the only ruler. He also states that independence is much simpler than reconciliation, and that it will be more worth fighting for in