The colonies prospered from transatlantic commerce during the eighteenth century. There was a greater abundance in goods in involving an enlarged market along with lower prices offered. As a result of the economic improvement and higher standards of living, common people were able to enjoy the goods that they barely had access to prior to the economic boost (Taylor, 310). They were in a huge demand of cheap labor to help them in plantations. Indentured services were introduced in thefirst place but it was later proved to be short-termed and less profitable. Slavery, on the other hand, was cheaper, stronger and had a much higher survival rate in harsh conditions. Their skin color was discriminated and everyone, even the judges considered themselves as more superior. The increasing import of slaves from Africa was thought to be more profitable, socially approved act in their self-centered, discriminating minds.
In the early eighteenth century, colonial America prospered as the slave trades expanded from Europe to the colonies. The English's consumption in tea from other neighboring countries such as India increased the need for sugar from the West Indies. In the amount of sugar consumed, they were imported to Britain from the West Indies, where plantations acquired thousands of slaves across the Atlantic through Europe. British America had gone through a conspicuous economic boost. Living expenses and operating costs were far less than those of England. Colonists were able to produce enough harvest for their own utilization as well as trading within the local communities and neighboring colonies (Taylor, 311). Many English emigrants entered the indentured services upon arriving British America given that colonial emigration did not guarantee professions for each person. Felons were sent to colonial America for indentured services as compensations for their committed crimes. The rapidly growing economy encouraged desperate explo…