Colonialism was a central part of an earlier form of globalisation. Also referred to as the ‘ first globalisation’, this phenomenon of modernity, is justified by having said it brought various advances and progress to backward countries. Due to imperialist lack of long-term objectives and resources, some of these backward countries were abandoned and left in states of anarchy, forced to accept the vicious loan/debt cycle. Colonialism’s main defect in that period was that the colonies starved of resources, thus leaving the process of de-colonisation the imperialist option. This effect of colonial experience was tragic and of relevance still, as these third world countries now experience a modern-day form of slavery, ‘debt slavery’. The incompetence of the imperialist leaders, and their confused policies are the reason debt slavery exists.
Colonialism culturally brought enlightened progress, with the introduction of Christianity and medicine. The foreign presence was of economic benefit as this is a necessary phase of ‘globalisation’, but this was inadequate of all that was required. In practice the imperialists generously offered conservative authority figures at most. Motivations of imperialism came from a rivalry between Britain and Germany, sided with Italy. Britain was threatened and felt they wouldn’t be safe without colonies, whereas their rivals wanted to gain control over colonies to emphasise nationalism. Greater economic competition, ideas of racial superiority and anxiety led the European powers to erratic improvisation: based on the need to meet the latest crises in the motherland. Essentially this was all that was important, securing the future of the home country. With continual arguments by the leaders, “Are colonies worth it?” there was no sense of moral duty but the notion of self-satisfaction. They did all that would benefit their own situation and safeguard their future. Colonies were a status symbol.