The American colonists, on the eve of the Revolution were very concrete in their identity as well as their unity.The colonists had endured many years of far off governance by the mother country, as well as intercolonial problems that could only be solved by coming together as one close knit colonial unit.The colonists had made their decision; that they were not going to be governed by the far off, and tyrant mother country of England, and they were going to come together as one to defend their beliefs.
The colonies had been exposed to many different instances in which they had to deal with a harsh suppression put on them by England.The Proclamation Act of 1763 was thefirst, and more would follow.The Quartering Act of 1765, The Stamp Act of 1675, and later the Townsend Acts.Mather Byles posed the question in his publication "…which is better, to be ruled by one tyrant three thousand miles away, or by three thousand tyrants not a mile away."He simply, but strongly makes the point that the colonists were becoming tired of being governed by some far off land.
Colonists, because of this harsh suppression began to strengthen their beliefs that this governance by England was not going to meet the needs of the colonists without raising some extreme controversial.In the Declaration for the Causes of Taking up Arms in July of 1775, it was obvious that the colonists were not initially looking for the separation to happen, but because of England's harshness, they had no choice."…we assure them that we mean not to dissolve that union which has so long and so happily subsisted between us, and which we sincerely wish to see restored…" All colonists in these beliefs would begin to strengthen their colonial unity.
The Revolution was the most prominent event in which it was necessary for all the colonists to be united for the same cause.The cartoon in the Pennsylvania Gazette in 1754, drawn b…