Slavery had begun on an economical basis, however by the late seventeenth century racial discrimination sculpted the American slave system.Slavery throughout the 1607 and 1775 grew in the southern colonies due to many economic, agricultural, and social factors.
England's southern mainland colonies, such as Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia were dominated by a plantation economy in which profitable stable crops were the rule (mainly rice and tobacco). Slavery was present in all these plantation colonies.Rice was an exotic food in England, however rice was grown in Africa.Therefore, Carolinians were soon paying paramount prices for West African slaves that were experienced and supposedly well skilled in rice cultivation.Chesapeake tobacco growers responded to the falling prices by planting more and bringing more product to market, therefore increasing the need for labor.Conversely, families formed to slowly, Indians quickly died when in contact with whites (due to disease), and African slaves were too expensive.Consequently, England had an excess of yeoman farmers willing to sacrifice themselves as indentured servants just for employment and its benefits in the colonies.During this period Chesapeake planters brought about 100,000 indentured servants to the region by 1700.Drastic change came in the 1680s when rising wages in England caused the diminishment of individuals willing to sacrifice for a new life in America.In 1698 the Royal African Company lost its crown-granted monopoly on carrying slaves to the colonies, triggering enterprising Americans to invest on the profitable slave trade.
Slaves primarily executed the sweaty labor of clearing swamps, grubbing out tress, and other unskilled tasks of such.The African's agricultural skill and their immunity to malaria made them the idyllic laborers on the hot and swampy rice plantations.In the deepest S