Colonial America experienced rapid growth during the 18th century, with its population doubling every 25 years. Much of the foundation and growth of the American colonies can be attributed to the promise of economic opportunity. While land was plentiful and labor was in high demand, the colonist;s opportunities to succeed where hindered by
Economic opportunity is relative to the next best alternative, especially to those Europeans immigrating to America in search of it. In Europe, the lower classes faced the effects of overpopulation, ;a crowded society, where every place is over-stocked.; In comparison, Document 6 continues on to say, ;there is room for every body in America.; (Document 6) Overpopulation in Europe caused a shortage of land and an excess unskilled labor force left jobless. According to Document 2, there was indeed economic opportunity for the aforementioned jobless, ;poor people (both men and women) of all kinds, can here get three times the wages for their labor they can in England or Wales.; (Document 2) In contrast, Gottlieb Mittelberger writes in his Journey to Pennsylvania that those who can perform manual labor in their own country should, ;stay THERE rather than come to America.; (Document 3) Mittelberger describes the price of indentured servitude as the, ;barter and [sale of] their children as if they were cattle.; (Document 3) To some, the heavy cost of indentured servitude was too much. To many immigrants, however, the price to pay to get to America was worth securing opportunity for themselves and their progeny.
What of those who where native born to the colonies? ;Here the rewards of his industry follow with equal steps the progress of his labor.; Document 6 promises economic prosperity equal to the amount of work applied in the New World. It goes on to say, ;Some few towns excepted, we are all tillers of the earth, from Nova Scotia …