America prides itself on the fact that every child in this nation is entitled to a free and well rounded education.This was not always the case.The establishment of schooling systems within America, was an evolutionary process.Each region in the country began with a system which suited them, whether that meant that children only learned what was necessary for survival or just basic reading and writing.Eventually, America began to realize that its children needed to educated.It then became a public issue, and the emergence of institutionalized learning centers originated.This still did not ensure that all children were educated, especially when it came to girls.Up until the aftermath of the American Revolution, education for girls was not a priority and not deemed very important.Only with the new ideology that emerged from that war, did the amendment of women's educational rights become considerable.
Very few colonial children received formal educations in the early years."As members of the family workforce, children were vocational apprentices of the parent of their own sex: fathers trained sons in agriculture or in the family trade, while mothers taught housewifery to their girls." Children were to be prepared for the immediate world of their upbringing, if reading and writing skills were not needed to tend to tobacco, then they were last to be taught.The attitude that prevailed, consisted of the idea that book learning, as a part of educational preparation for those headed for a career in the family trade or for girls destined to be housewives, was audacious, although this form of learning may have been present.However, male children were more likely to be literate and possess a variety of training in comparison to their sisters, who usually only acquired skills through everyday life activities.
Often neighbors (usually a indigent widow) would teach children reading,writing and spelling…