At the conclusion of the WWII Germany was divided into 4 zones of occupation controlled by Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Berlin, the capital of Germany, was located in the Soviet controlled section of Germany. A lack of agreement and compromise with the Soviet Union concerning the unity of Germany led to the beginning of the Cold War. An American, Financier Bernard Baruch in a congressional debatefirst used the term Cold War in 1947. A cold war can be defined as a condition of tension and conflict short of an actual war as was the case with America and the Soviet Union. In June 1948 the three allies, France, Great Britain, and the United States, established the German Federal Republic in West Germany, which they controlled. The Soviet Union, however, opposed any government run by any western powers and took many measures to prevent this new government from staying in power.
On June 24, 1948 the soviets began a blockade of all land traffic to the western zone of Berlin, hoping to starve it of supplies and perhaps breaking down. But the US, France, and Great Britain, would not back down to the Soviets and so they began to airlift all supplies to West Germany. After about a year on May 12, 1949 the soviets realized their defeat and ended the blockade. The United States realized that the soviets expansionist aims threatened not only Europe but developing nations of the world as well. (Microsoft Encyclopedia Encarta)
In 1949, President Truman approved the Point Four Program, which put aside nearly $400 million for technical development in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Truman had the idea that if these developing countries would modernize and strengthen their economies the growth of communism would be discouraged. In 1949 the United States joined with 11 other western nations in an alliance to form the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), which provided collective security in …