Ever have one of those times in which you just don't know who's right? Well, both General Robert E. Lee, and President Abraham Lincoln had one of those times, during the civil war. Robert E. Lee's "Letter to His Son", shows the conflict that took place in him, between aligning his power with his state, or aligning with the union.However, Abraham Lincoln's conflict was how to just keep the union together. His speeches of Gettysburg, and his 2nd Inaugural address, show this personal conflict. The two major players during the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln, and Robert E. Lee, both had personal conflicts, regarding the union.
Abraham Lincoln, the Civil War president. While it seems that he had everything in his favor, he also had a personal struggle, with the north and south. This is shown in his Gettysburg speech, "… [t]esting whether that a nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure." This explains that the conflict of the north and south is not one conflict that can be done by many nations, and that this nation is torn between ideas. However, this conflict is really shown in his 2nd inaugural speech, "Both parties deprecated war…but one would make war…and the other would accept war." This clearly shows that Lincoln not only blames the north for the war, but the south also. Unlike Robert E. Lee's conflict, Lincoln's conflict involves the nation, and not just himself.
Robert E. Lee's conflict, was one personal to him. In "Letter to his Son", Lee tells his son that, "I take great pride in my country…and would defend ant state if her rights were invaded. But I can anticipate no greater calamity for the country than a dissolution of the Union." This tells us that Lee wants to support his nation, but also wants to support the state in which he lives. He proclaims that, "I hope…that all constitutional means will be …