The idea of a global village in modern terms brings up thoughts of a world that is completely connected on each continent by telephone, media, and Internet.The idea of a small world has become a part of everyday life only recently.Although the world has not gotten smaller since the 13th century, it has become more closely connected.This connection was thought to be the work of Western Europeans during the age of exploration and furthered during the imperial age, but now historians using an entirely different approach to history have reanalyzed this idea.By looking at the time in a more global aspect, historians have now reconsidered the idea that Western European expansion caused the connection of the global community.The study of a time period has changed from just a centralized region of study to a study of the event occurring all over the world during the same time frame.Chapter twelve discusses the trans-asian trade routes during the 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries.
Trade in Asia during the 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries was expanding rapidly while in Western Europe the fall of the Roman Empire created a time of chaos which lead to the Medieval period.The booming economies of the Eastern World due to trade routes were in stark contrast to the dreadfully poor and defunct lives of Western Europeans.
The examples used in the chapter showed a very organized society of merchants and consumers in the East who were essentially thriving in an almost completely free market.This is evident by the amount of "boom" towns cropping up all around the trade routes.Places that were essentially isolated from the rest of the known world were becoming wealthy due to the traffic caused by traders.
In the early years of Asian trading, most traders used land routes that took them over desolate areas.Because most area on the land trade route were Persian or of Iranian-speaking decent, the universal language of tra…