Argos was founded by Phoroneus; he named it after his son, Argos. It was the second largest city-state in Ancient Greece, and for centuries, the most important one.
Argos was subsidiary to Mycenae until the Dorian invasion in the 12th century BC. Then Argos became the most prominent Greek city-state in the northeastern Peloponnese. Argos and the Early Hoplite Greek lists begin in 680 BC proper, which coincides with the dates attributed to the rise of King Pheidon of Argos, who is attributed with formalizing the hoplite system and reuniting the Argolid city-states under Argive rule.Though, Argos became held in disgrace by other city-states in 480 BC when Athens and Sparta asked Argos' polis to send supplies, and Argos refused. Argos had a very successful military. Argos has always been productive during times of war and peace.
Argos and Sparta were competing city-states
Argos' weather is usually hot & dry in the summer, and cold and wet in the winter; since it's polis is located on a plain. The Argives' soil is not very fertile, compelling them to fight the elements for food. This was a major hardship for them, but inspite of this, Argives were superior and an envy to th0e other Greek city-states.
In 146 BC Argos became part of the Roman province of Achaea (province of Argos) and flourished as a center of arts and trade during the Roman period. Argos was most famous for it's statues of athletes; magnificent and rippling with muscle. The were also famous for their wonderful musicians and poets. Argos was thefirst place in all of Greece where plays were performed in open-air theatres; they drew crowds of over 20,000. Drama reached new heights in Argos' polis.
Corinth, as a coastal city, had it's own bank and successful works program. From this, their history flourished. Though, Corinth was never the mo