It is arguable to say that humans are inherently violent. A look at the various definitions of violence and what it is presumed to be, a learned behaviour or an instinct, will give an insight into the connection between violence and humans. Various scholars seem to suggest that societal structures lead to violence and it cannot be part of the human system but a learned behaviour. Inherently suggests that it exists as an in separable part or is natural to humans.
The standard Oxford dictionary definition for violence is, use of physical force usually intended to cause injury or destruction: great force or strong in action, feeling or expression. Jamil Salmi defines violence in four categories. Thefirst is direct violence that refers to acts of deliberate violence resulting in a direct attack on a person' s physical or psychological integrity. This includes such acts as homicides, torture, rape and assault. The second is indirect violence which causes harmful, sometimes deadly situations or actions caused by human intervention but without a direct relationship between the parties involved. This includes ignoring humans in danger or in need (violence by omission) and mediated violence, which is altering of natural or social environments endangering people. Repressive violence includes deprivation of fundamental rights like equality between man and women at work. The last is alienating violence that includes also deprivation of higher rights. Such things as ethnocide, social ostracism and racism fall under this type of violence.
From the given definitions we see that violence can be either be learned or be an instinct. In Man and Society, Sigmund Freud says, " a powerful measure of desire for aggression has to be reckoned as part of their (men) instinct endowment" (Manis Clark page133: 1960), Freud argues that this aggressive behaviour lies in wait for some provocation if there is none, it steps into the service for s…